More architectural firms bullish about increase in workload

There is also more expectation for staffing levels to increase. (AFP)

The number of architectural practices expecting workload to increase over the past two months rose by 10 per cent to hit 38 per cent in February from 28 per cent in January, according to the Royal Institute of British Architects (Riba) monthly Future Trends Survey.

February results present a variable picture compared to January's, with visible improvements in workload and predictions across work sectors, but poor progress in terms of staffing and underemployment levels.

The survey was established in January 2009 to monitor business and employment trends affecting the architecture profession.

There was also a very small increase in the number of practices expecting staff levels to increase (from five per cent in January to seven per cent in February), although the number of firms expecting staff levels to decrease rose by six per cent (16 per cent in February, compared to 12 per cent in January). Twenty-eight per cent of respondents said they were personally underemployed in February, compared to 26 per cent in January.

The survey revealed improvements in forecasted workload predictions across the private housing and public sectors; 31 per cent of practices expected private housing work to increase in February, compared to just 24 per cent in January, and less practices expected workload to decrease (14 per cent in February, compared to 18 per cent in January).

Predictions for increased work within the public sector also increased, with 15 per cent of practices predicting an increase in February, compared to 11 per cent in January, and a drop in the number of practices predicting a decrease (21 per cent in February, and 24 per cent in January). The commercial sector reported consistent results, with 21 per cent of practices predicting an increase in workload in both January and February, compared to 16 per cent in December 2009.

Seventy per cent of practices expected a drop in workload in January and February, compared to 15 per cent in December 2009.

 

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