'Fake' wife on 'fake' documents is runaway maid - Emirates24|7

'Fake' wife on 'fake' documents is runaway maid

All these fake passports are made abroad and sold through middle-men to those interested in getting them. (Shutterstock)

A UAE national was caught when he tried to deceive authorities by showing fake marriage documents to amend the status of his 'fake wife' who turned out to be a run-away African housemaid.
 
Speaking to 'Emirates24|7', Chancellor Ali Humaid bin Khatem, Advocate-General and Head of Dubai Naturalisation and Residency Prosecution said the man was caught at the Dubai Naturalisation and Residency Department (DNRD).

Chancellor Ali Humaid bin Khatem, Advocate-General and Head of Immigration Prosecution in Dubai. (Supplied)
 
“He met this African housemaid who stopped work and ran away from her sponsor. Then, they agreed that he would marry her on paper only to amend her residency status in the country, and also wave some of her fines.

“They proceeded with the fake marriage, and then went to get her proper residency visa.”
 
He pointed out that at the DNRD, officers suspected the marriage, and sent them to the investigation department.
 
“During investigation, they confessed that their marriage is fake, and they did so just to get her a proper resident visa. And after that, she was going to continue working as an illegal housemaid to earn money.”
 
He pointed out that both of them were punished, and no matter how smart the violators think they are, they will be caught.
 
“Residents as well as nationals must abide by residency laws.

“These laws are to protect residents in this country. If anyone does not wish to work, they can ask to be returned to their home country or to their country’s consulate.

“They cannot just stop working and run away from the sponsor as they put them in serious legal problems.”

Asian woman fined Dh100,000 for hiring illegal housemaids

A Pakistani woman was fined twice in less than one year for hiring illegal housemaids, and she paid fines totalling Dh100,000.

Speaking to ‘Emirates 24|7’, Ali Humaid bin Khatem, Advocate-General and Head of Immigration Prosecution in Dubai, said the woman hired a housemaid who had run away from her sponsor.

“One day, while this housemaid was outside her new employer’s house, she was caught by officers. Upon questioning she confessed that she had run away from her sponsor and was hired by the Pakistani woman to work as a housemaid.

"She gave the officers her new employer’s house address. The woman was called to the Prosecution and fined Dh50,000 for hiring a housemaid who was not on her visa,” said Ali.

Within seven months cops caught another housemaid who was working illegally.

“During investigations, she confessed to working for a Pakistani woman, and gave officials the address of that woman. When officers went to the house, they discovered she was the same woman who was fined just a few months back. The woman was called again, a case filed against her and fined Dh50,000,” he said.

Ali added that this was the first time a person was fined twice for the same such violation.

“Residents should be more aware. They should not hire people who are not on their visas. This can cause many serious problems.

"It can even put the person and his or her family in danger as these housemaids or illegal workers are unknown people, and they don’t know their medical history or security records.

"It is possible that they might have committed serious crimes and that’s the reason they ran away. Or they might have some contagions disease,” he said.

Ali said those caught hiring illegal workers who are not on their visas will be fined Dh50,000 per worker.

UAE expats buying fake passports for up to $30K face jail terms

An increasing number of Arabs and Asian expatriates living and working in the country have been caught for buying fake American, British and some other European and African passports, according to a top official.

Speaking to Emirates 24|7, Ali Humaid bin Khatem, Advocate-General and Head of Naturalisation and Residency Prosecution in Dubai, said, “Mainly these expatriates buy fake passports that are made abroad from middle-men who convince them into buying them, in order to travel around the world without visas, and also to be able to sponsor their families.

“These are mainly North American passports, as well as some European and British passports. All these fake passports are made abroad and sold through middle-men to those interested in getting them.”

He warned residents from buying fake passports as this will put them in serious legal problems. “If those caught with fake passports have a UAE residency visa on it, then it will be considered a crime of forging official documents. And if it does not have UAE residency visa, then it will be considered a crime of forging unofficial documents. In both cases, they will face a jail term of up to three months.”

He pointed out that these passports are being sold for high prices. “Most of the passports are being sold for not less than $30,000 to $50,000. They pay big amount of money and end up in jail. So, it is better for them to be more careful of not violating the laws of the country and avoid illegal issues,” explained Chancellor Ali.

He added that most of these passports are caught at the airports when those carrying them try to leave the country. “They are also caught at the General Department of Naturalization and Residency when they try to get visas on the basis of these passports.”

He said these type of cases started last year, and they have seen a few cases in the first quarter of this year. “The problem is that at the end, only those who buy these fake passports end up in jail, and also lose huge amount of money they paid to middle men to get them,” he added.

He pointed out that one of the main problems faced by them is the lack of knowledge among residents and expatriates of the consequences of their actions. “They should be more aware and abide by the rules and regulations of the country. This will protect them from becoming victims of middle-men who persuade them into violating the laws."

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