#NepalQuake: 1 million children affected [video] - Emirates24|7

#NepalQuake: 1 million children affected [video]

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LATEST: Almost one million children urgently need help after an earthquake claimed more than 3,200 lives in Nepal, the UN children's agency said, as relief workers raced to help the most vulnerable.

"At least 940,000 children living in areas severely affected by (the) earthquake in Nepal are in urgent need of humanitarian assistance," it said in a statement.

Thousands of Nepalis began fleeing the capital Kathmandu on Monday, terror-stricken by two days of powerful aftershocks and fearing shortages of food and water after an earthquake that killed more than 3,200 people.

Nepal's police say at least 3,617 people have been confirmed killed in Saturday's earthquake, including 1,302 in the Kathmandu Valley alone.

In addition, 6,515 people were injured nationwide, the police department said in a Tweet.

Roads leading out of the mountain valley city of one million were jammed with people, many with babies in their arms, trying to climb onto buses or hitch a ride aboard cars and trucks.

More mild tremors are being reported in Nepal.

Sunday, April 27

India on Sunday dispatched 13 military aircraft to Nepal loaded with tonnes of food, blankets and other aid, stepping up relief efforts to its earthquake-devastated neighbour.

Rescuers dug with their bare hands and bodies piled up in Nepal on Sunday after an earthquake devastated the heavily crowded Kathmandu Valley, killing more than 2,500 people, and triggered a deadly avalanche on Mount Everest.

A big aftershock between Kathmandu and Everest unleashed more avalanches in the Himalayas. In the capital, hospital workers stretchered patients out onto the street to treat them as it was too dangerous to keep them indoors.

"Another one, we have an aftershock right now!" said Indian climber Arjun Vajpai over the phone from Makalu base camp near Everest. "Avalanche!" he shouted. Screams and the roar of crashing snow could be heard over the line as he spoke.

The tremor, measured at 6.7, was the most powerful since Saturday's 7.9 quake - itself the strongest since Nepal's worst earthquake disaster of 1934 that killed 8,500 people.

The aftershock rocked buildings in the Indian capital New Delhi and halted the city metro.

"There is no way one can forecast the intensity of aftershocks so people need to be alert for the next few days," said L.S. Rathore, chief of India's weather office.

In Everest's worst disaster, the bodies of 17 climbers were recovered from the mountain on Sunday after being caught in avalanches. A plane carrying the first 15 injured climbers landed in Kathmandu at around noon local time.

"There is a lot of confusion on the mountain. The toll will rise," said Gelu Sherpa, one of the walking wounded among the first 15 injured climbers flown to Kathmandu. "Tents have been blown away," said Sherpa, his head in bandages.

With Nepal's government overwhelmed by the scale of the disaster, India flew in medical supplies and relief crews, while China sent in a 60-strong emergency team. Relief agencies said hospitals in the Kathmandu Valley were overflowing and running out of medical supplies.

Army officer Santosh Nepal and a group of rescuers worked all night to open a passage into a collapsed building in Kathmandu. They had to use pick axes because bulldozers could not get through the ancient city's narrow streets.

"We believe there are still people trapped inside," he told Reuters, pointing at concrete debris and twisted reinforcement rods where a three-storey residential building once stood.

Among the capital's landmarks destroyed in the earthquake was the 60-metre (200-foot) Dharahara Tower, built in 1832 for the queen of Nepal, with a viewing balcony that had been open to visitors for the last 10 years.
A jagged stump was all that was left of the lighthouse-like structure. As bodies were pulled from the ruins on Saturday, a policeman said up to 200 people had been trapped inside.

Bodies were still arriving on Sunday at one hospital in Kathmandu, where police officer Sudan Shreshtha said his team had brought 166 corpses overnight.

"I am tired and exhausted, but I have to work and have the strength," Shreshtha told Reuters as an ambulance brought three more victims to the Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital.

Bodies were heaped in a dark room, some covered with cloth, some not. A boy aged about seven had his face half missing and his stomach bloated like a football. The stench of death was overpowering.

Outside, a 30-year-old woman who had been widowed wailed: "Oh Lord, oh God, why did you take him alone? Take me along with him also."
"Both private and government hospitals have run out of space and are treating patients outside, in the open," said Nepal's envoy to India, Deep Kumar Upadhyay. Prime Minister Sushil Koirala is back from abroad and will soon address the country.

NEED A DECISION

Save the Children's Peter Olyle said hospitals in the Kathmandu Valley were running out of storage room for bodies and emergency supplies. "There is a need for a government decision on bringing in kits from the military," he said from Kathmandu.

Some buildings in Kathmandu toppled like houses of cards, others leaned at precarious angles, and partial collapses exposed living rooms and furniture in place and belongings stacked on shelves.

Rescuers, some wearing face masks to keep out the dust, scrambled over mounds of splintered timber and broken bricks in the hope of finding survivors. Some used their bare hands to fill small white buckets with dirt and rock.
Thousands of people spent the night outside in chilly temperatures and patchy rain, too afraid to return to their damaged homes.

On Sunday, survivors wandered the streets clutching bed rolls and blankets, while others sat in the street cradling their children, surrounded by a few plastic bags of belongings.

The 7.9 magnitude quake struck at midday on Saturday at a busy time of year for the tourism-reliant country's trekking and climbing season, with an estimated 300,000 foreign tourists in the country, home to many World Heritage sites.

Police put the death toll in Nepal at 2,152, with 5,463 hurt. At least 700 were killed in the capital, a city of about 1 million people where many homes are old, poorly built and packed close together.

Some 49 people were reported killed in neighbouring India, which has sent military aircraft to Nepal with medical equipment and relief teams. It also said it had dispatched 285 members of its National Disaster Response Force.

In Tibet, the death toll climbed to 17, according to a tweet from China's state news agency, Xinhua. Four people were killed in Bangladesh.

EARLIER REPORT: A 6.7-magnitude aftershock struck earthquake-devastated Nepal on Sunday, the USGS said, with climbers reporting the tremor triggered more avalanches on Mount Everest.

The latest quake struck northeast of Kathmandu near the border with China at a depth of 10 kilometres (6.2 miles), the US Geological Survey said.

Climber Jim Davidson said he felt the aftershock at Camp One on Everest.

"Just had our biggest aftershock yet here at C1 on Everest. Smaller than original quake but glacier shook & avalanches," he tweeted.

Aftershock of 6.7 magnitude hits Nepal: USGS

Nepal experienced 2nd earthquake of 6.7 magnitude at 12.39pm. Epicentre 65km east of Kathmandu - The Hindu.

Major aftershock shakes Kathmandu, sending people yelling and running for open ground: AP

Fresh tremors have been felt in New Delhi, Indian media are reporting.

The death toll from an avalanche on Mount Everest has risen to 14 and could rise further, a Nepalese official said Sunday. "Fourteen deaths have been confirmed so far. We fear that the toll may rise, said Gyanendra Kumar Shrestha, an official in Nepal's tourism department.

Rescuers dug with their bare hands and bodies piled up in Nepal on Sunday after an earthquake devastated the heavily crowded Kathmandu valley, killing at least 1,900, and triggered a deadly avalanche on Mount Everest.

Army office Santosh Nepal led a group of rescuers that worked all night to open a passage into a collapsed building in the capital of Kathmandu. They had to use pick axes because bulldozers could not get through the ancient city's narrow streets.

"We believe there are still people trapped inside," he told Reuters, pointing at concrete debris and twisted reinforcement rods that was once a three-storey residential building.

More than 1,800 dead

A massive earthquake killed more than 1,800 people Saturday as it tore through large parts of Nepal, toppling office blocks and towers in Kathmandu and triggering a deadly avalanche at Everest base camp.

Over 4,700 people have been injured.

At least 1,880 people are known to have died in Nepal, officials said, making it the quake-prone and impoverished Himalayan nation's worst disaster in more than 80 years.

But the final toll from the 7.8 magnitude quake could be much higher, and dozens more people were reported killed in neighbouring India and China.

Offers of help poured in from governments around the world, with the United States and European Union announcing they were sending in disaster response teams, as emergency workers fanned out across Nepal to rescue those trapped under collapsed homes and buildings.

"The death toll has reached 1,170," Nepal police spokesman Kamal Singh Bam told AFP.
"Deaths have been reported from all regions except the far west. All our security personnel have been deployed to rescue and assist those in need."

The Red Cross (IFRC) said it was concerned about the fate of rural villages close to the epicentre of the quake northwest of the capital Kathmandu, where a historic tower collapsed.

"Roads have been damaged or blocked by landslides and communication lines are down preventing us from reaching local Red Cross branches to get accurate information," said IFRC Asia/Pacific director Jagan Chapagain.

Click to read... Climbers tweet 'hell' from Mt Everest

Historic tower collapses

But the worst damage was reported in Kathmandu, where the historic nine-storey Dharahara tower, a major tourist attraction, was among the buildings brought down.

At least a dozen bodies were taken away from the ruins of the 19th-century tower, according to an AFP photographer who saw similar scenes of multiple casualties in other parts of the city.

"It was difficult to breath, but I slowly moved the debris. Someone then pulled me out. I don't know where my friends are," Dharmu Subedi, 36, who was standing outside the tower when it collapsed, said from a hospital bed.

At least 34 people were known to have died in India, including 23 in the eastern state of Bihar, while buildings in the capital New Delhi had to be evacuated.

The United States Geological Survey said the shallow quake struck 77 kilometres (48 miles) northwest of Kathmandu at 0611 GMT, with walls crumbling and families racing outside their homes.

"The walls of houses have collapsed around me onto the road. All the families are outside in their yards huddled together," an AFP reporter said in Kathmandu.

Another resident, Anupa Shrestha, recounted scenes of panic and mayhem, saying "everything started shaking, everything fell down."

The quake tore through the middle of highways in the capital and also caused damage to the country's only international airport which was briefly closed.

Kari Cuelenaere, an official at the Dutch embassy, said the impact had swept the water out of a swimming pool at a Kathmandu hotel where Dutch national day was being celebrated.

"It was horrible, all of a sudden all the water came up out of the pool and drenched everyone, the children started screaming," Cuelenaere told AFP. "Some parts of the city fell down, there was dust rising... There were many (rescue) helicopters."

Aftershock tremors could be felt more than two hours after the initial quake.

USGS initially measured the quake at 7.5 magnitude and later adjusted it to 7.8, with a depth of 15 kilometres. It said in a predictor graphic that there was a 17 percent chance the quake could claim more than 100,000 lives.

Everest 'chaos'

At least 10 people were killed when an avalanche buried parts of Mount Everest's base camp in Nepal where hundreds of mountaineers have gathered at the start of the annual climbing season, officials said.

Google executive Dan Fredinburg was the only climber killed so far identified.

Lawrence You, director of privacy at Google, said Fredinburg was with three other Google employees, who all survived. He added that Google.org was contributing $1 million to response efforts.
Experienced mountaineers said panic erupted at base camp, which had been "severely damaged", while one described the avalanche as "huge".

"Huge disaster. Helped searched and rescued victims through huge debris area. Many dead. Much more badly injured. More to die if not heli asap," tweeted Romanian climber Alex Gavan from base camp.

Gyanendra Kumar Shrestha, an official in Nepal's tourism department, told AFP: "We are trying to assess how many are injured. There might be over 1,000 people there right now, including foreign climbers and Nepalese supporting staff."

AFP Nepal bureau chief Ammu Kannampilly, on an assignment to Everest together with a colleague, was among those caught up in the chaos.

"We are both ok... snowing here so no choppers coming," she said in an SMS on an approach to base camp. "I hurt my hand - got it bandaged and told to keep it upright to stop the bleeding."

 


An  man walks past damage caused by an earthquake in Kathmandu, Nepal, Saturday, April 25, 2015. A strong magnitude-7.9 earthquake shook Nepal's capital and the densely populated Kathmandu Valley before noon Saturday, causing extensive damage with toppled walls and collapsed buildings, officials said. (AP)
 


In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, a collapsed building is seen in Nepal's capital Kathmandu Saturday, April 25, 2015. A strong earthquake shook Nepal's capital and the densely populated Kathmandu Valley before noon Saturday, causing extensive damage with toppled walls and collapsed buildings, officials said. (Xinhua via AP)

Offers of support

A spokesman for Nepal's home ministry said the government had released around $500 million as emergency funds for rescue operations.

India dispatched two military transport planes to help with the rescue and relief efforts and there were similar offers from around the region, including Sri Lanka and Pakistan.

The US Agency for International Development (USAID) said a disaster response was being flown to Nepal and that the Obama administration had authorised an initial $1 million "to address immediate needs".

Britain, Germany, Norway, and Spain also pledged support and assistance, as international aid groups, including Action Against Hunger (ACF) and Christian Aid, mobilised funds and teams to send to Nepal.
Pope Francis said he was "deeply saddened" by the tragedy, in a telegram sent by his Secretary of State Pietro Parolin to the Nepalese Catholic authorities.

People stand on the runway outside the International Terminal after a earthquake hit, at Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu, Nepal, April 25, 2015, in this handout courtesy of Dhany Osman. The massive earthquake measuring 7.9 magnitude struck 80 km (50 miles) east of Pokhara in Nepal on Saturday, causing some buildings in the capital Kathmandu to collapse, witnesses said. (REUTERS)

 


People stand on the runway outside the International Terminal after a earthquake hit, at Tribhuvan International Airport, Kathmandu, Nepal, April 25, 2015, in this handout courtesy of Dhany Osman. The massive earthquake measuring 7.9 magnitude struck 80 km (50 miles) east of Pokhara in Nepal on Saturday, causing some buildings in the capital Kathmandu to collapse, witnesses said. (REUTERS)

Tremors were felt as far away as New Delhi and other northern cities in India, witnesses said.    


People take refuge at a school after a 7.7 magnitude earthquake struck in Kathmandu, Nepal, April 25, 2015. The earthquake struck 80 km (50 miles) east of Pokhara in Nepal on Saturday, about half-way between the town and the capital Kathmandu, the U.S. Geological Survey said, and witnesses said some buildings in Kathmandu had collapsed.  (REUTERS)




People take refuge at a school after a 7.7 magnitude earthquake struck in Kathmandu, Nepal, April 25, 2015. The earthquake struck 80 km (50 miles) east of Pokhara in Nepal on Saturday, about half-way between the town and the capital Kathmandu, the U.S. Geological Survey said, and witnesses said some buildings in Kathmandu had collapsed. (REUTERS)

 

 

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