Crazy World: £37,000 for an anti-smartphone...

No-frills, anti-smartphone comes with a huge price tag...

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Phone doesn't do anything so plebeian as email or Angry Birds.

COPENHAGEN: No Google, no GPS, no camera... so why such a huge price tag for the Æsir YB1?

Rich people don't need iPhones  -  they've got staff to manage their calendars, send emails and 'like' other aristocrats' Facebook posts.

They tend to buy phones that do less than most  -  hence the Æsir which, despite its stern Scandinavian design and horrifying price tag, does barely anything at all. This is a phone to be seen with  -  not to be stuck on a desert island with.

The Esir is, according to the company's CEO, 'an anti-smartphone'.

It doesn't do anything so plebeian as email or Angry Birds  -  it just does clear voice calls and text messages.

But unlike rivals (ie, nouveau-riche favourite Vertu) it isn't just a posh 'skin' for another phone. It took three years to design, is made from watch-grade material by European craftsmen, and everything down to the ring tones has been designed specially for it.

That may be slim consolation when you look at the smoking ruins of your bank account, of course.

This model costs £6,400... and the gold-plated one is £37,000.

Baby treated for being drunk; Six-year-old high on drugs

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BRITAIN: A one-year-old child ended up in hospital for being drunk and a six-year-old was admitted while high on illegal drugs.

The cases are among hundreds of children, including babies and toddlers, being treated at the Royal Bolton Hospital because of drug and alcohol abuse, reports The Daily Mail.

Nine children aged 12 and under, as well as hundreds of teenagers, have been seen for some form of alcohol poisoning.

Nine babies younger than a year old and more than 100 one and two-year-olds needed medical help after drugs poisoning.

More than 70 three to ten-year-olds and hundreds of teenagers have ended up in A&E as a result of drugs, including a three-year-old and a six-year-old who took controlled drugs, a one-year-old with solvent poisoning and teenagers as young as 13 taking deliberate overdoses.

Health chiefs said they were worried about the figures as drugs and alcohol can cause 'significant harm' to the developing brains of children.

The figures, obtained by The Bolton News under a Freedom of Information Act request, show that children as young as a few months old have been taken to the Royal Bolton Hospital because of substance abuse.

The information covers everything from alcohol abuse to poisoning, including overdoses, of medicines, controlled drugs, illegal drugs and solvents over the past three years.

The Royal Bolton Hospital said that many of the incidents involving young children were thought to be accidents - for example with parents giving sick children too much medicine, or toddlers helping themselves to drinks.

Bear and tiger go on diet together

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UK: Greedy Baloo the bear gives his tubby tiger pal Shere Khan a cuddle - before they get together to go on a DIET.

The unlikely friends and fellow fatty Leo the lion have been spoilt at a rescue centre in Georgia, US, and gained an amazing SEVEN STONE apiece, reports The Sun.

Now the trio, saved as cubs in 1991, are cutting back. Wonder who will be King of the Slimmers.

Qantas food 'kept in storage for months'

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AUSTRALIA: Qantas is misleading flyers by serving frozen food instead of the "fresh" produce it promotes.

Only salads are now freshly prepared by Q-Catering for business-class passengers, with the rest of the meals including toast, scrambled eggs and steak sandwiches, brought in frozen from Qantas-owned Snapfresh and kept in storage for months.

Q-Catering staff have blown the whistle on the practice, providing photographs of the pre-packaged meals.

One employee said Q-Catering used to have to meet high standards of preparation and presentation but now "lumps of frozen food were simply dumped in china bowls and covered".

"The use-by dates on the food can be up to 12 months, so any suggestion the food is fresh could not be further from the truth," she said.

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