Cheque issues comprise 57% of police complaints

Cheque issues comprise 57% of police complaints. (EB FILE)

The number of people who are wanted in Abu Dhabi for the charge of giving a cheque without credit totalled 3,000 in the first quarter of last year, including 300 women and girls, a study by the Centre of Research and Security Studies at the General Headquarters of Abu Dhabi Police has revealed.

The number of cheque complaints totalled 4,500, which accounts for 57 per cent of the total 9,084 complaints received by the Capital Police Directorate, the study entitled "banking checks and problems resulting from their issuance", added. The study contained four researches. The first research dealt with civil responsibility for the issuance of cheques in UAE commercial transactions law. The second research was related to the role of cheques in the national economy. The third focused on bouncing cheques from a security perspective, while the fourth dealt with the importance of cheques and the role of policemen in credit protection.

The study called banks not to exploit cheques signed by clients to file complaints on the full sum without mentioning total installments paid by the client until he stopped the payment. It warned against exploiting the need of people for money and their presentation of blank cheques.

It underlined the importance of banks' co-ordination with UAE Central Bank to clarify the borrower's financial situation in case he had commitments to other banks. The study said it was necessary there are alternative methods for banks in case the client stopped payments due to some strong reasons.

The study called to activate the monitoring of UAE Central Bank on banks to limit personal loans which are used in consumer and entertainment fields, introduce strict regulations of loans and avoid offers presented to the clients without looking at the capabilities of borrowers and their ability of payment.

 

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