Angelina Jolie 'proud' of son Maddox for getting into college

Maddox Chivan Jolie-Pitt, Pax Thien Jolie-Pitt, Angelina Jolie, Vivienne Marcheline Jolie-Pitt, Knox Leon Jolie-Pitt and Shiloh Nouvel Jolie-Pitt. (AFP)

Angelina Jolie is "nothing but proud" of her oldest son Maddox, who is starting college this year.

The 43-year-old actress is preparing to send her 17-year-old son Maddox - whom she has with ex-husband Brad Pitt, with whom she also has Pax, 15, Zahara, 14, Shiloh, 12 and twins Vivienne and Knox, 10 - to higher education later this year, and has said she couldn't be happier with everything he's achieved in his life so far.

Speaking to People magazine, she said: "I'm nothing but proud. I look forward to all he will do."

The 'Maleficent' star didn't specify which college Maddox is enrolling in, however he was seen visiting campuses in Seoul, South Korea with his mother last November, whilst she was in the country on an official visit as the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugee (UNHCR) Special Envoy.

Meanwhile, Angelina previously admitted she doesn't want her children to be "perfectly behaved", because she finds their "rebellious streak" to be "wonderful".

She said: "It's funny - children can do two things. They can make you grow up, and you do, and they also add a sense of wild themselves.

"They all have a good rebellious streak that is wonderful and curious. And I don't want them to be perfectly behaved little people that just say what's absolutely appropriate because I say so - they have to find themselves."

The 'Tomb Raider' actress also does her best to "insert good stuff" into her children's lives, but said she knows she can't "control everything" they might see on the Internet. Although the children don't have social media accounts, Angelina often discusses the dangers of the online platforms with her brood, as she said they've already seen "inaccurate" things about themselves online.

She said: "Like most parents, we try our best to insert good stuff, and we can't control everything that they're exposed to.

"Here's the truth - is that my children have seen things about themselves, even from what's considered serious news people, that are inaccurate. So my children have a very odd sense of who's telling the truth and what the truth really is and what they actually believe or trust."

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