Why Prince William and Duchess Catherine don't hold hands

Prince William and Duchess Catherine don't hold hands in public as they don't need to "prove" their love, according to body language expert Robin Kermode.

Pic: Bang

The royal couple are regularly spotted at arm's length from each other whilst out and about but body language expert Robin Kermode insists they are following in the footsteps of the Queen.

He said: "The Queen rarely holds hands with her husband in public and this seems to have set an unwritten precedent for the other royals.

Pic: Getty Images

"It is very clear that William and Kate are emotionally close, however, they do not seem to feel the need to prove their love - particularly when on official state business.

"They come across as a strong, independent couple and while they are always on show, they do not feel the need to 'show' their love for each other to the world."

And he went on to reveal that when couples hold hands in public, it is often used deliberately to show unity.

Pic: Getty Images

He added to the Mail Online: 'We have seen this gesture from politicians and celebrities who have had marital problems; they grab their partner's hand in a bid to prove that things are fine.

"[President Trump] is holding onto the hands of world leaders too long and you can see people literally trying to pull their hands away. William and Kate are definitely not in that sphere!"

It comes after it was revealed the Prince doesn't wear his wedding ring because it is "traditionally not the done thing for gentlemen to wear jewellery".

Pic: Getty Images

Etiquette expert William Hanson shared: "It is not unusual at all for men from the upper sets in Britain to shun wearing a wedding band. This is not because of any intentions that they may wish to play away from home once married, but because it was traditionally not the done thing for gentlemen to wear jewellery.

"Years ago, this even included watches, but even hardened snobs have relaxed on that front. Not wearing a wedding band is one of those quirky British silent class indicators, like the colour of your shoes on a Thursday, or the way you fold your top pocket handkerchief."

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