Safety with E24|7: Keep kids safe on FB

Your part in safer Internet

February 9 was Safer Internet Day, where 100 countries marked the day. The Internet doesn't just belong to those 100 countries, it belongs to you. And you play a role in keeping it safe too. Facebook's Head of Global Safety, Antigone Davis has some tips to help parents take more control over their security and privacy, and keep their children safer online.

This year's theme is ‘Play Your Part for a Better Internet’. Whether your child is creating an online account for the first time or you have a teen browsing the Internet with little supervision, every parent has a role in making the Internet a safer place for all.

These best practices make that responsibility a bit more manageable, and can be presented as “resolutions” every parent should make in 2016, or as simple tips and tricks for keeping your kids safer online.

5 tips for parents:

1) Stick with what works. Typically, you can employ the same parenting style for your kid's online activities as you do offline. If you find your child responds best to a negotiated agreement, create a contract that you can both sign. Or, maybe your child just needs to know the basic rules. In that case, you can establish them early when you first buy a mobile device for him or her.

2) The old adage your kids will “do as you do, not as you say,” is as true online as it is offline. Try to be a good role model. If you set time restrictions on when your child can use social media or be online (i.e., no texting after 10pm), modeling that same behavior makes a big difference. If you want your child to be civil online, model civility and respect in your texts to him or her.

3) Engage early and establish norms. Data suggests parents should engage online with their children as soon as they are on social media, by friending them as soon as they join Facebook or following them on Instagram when they sign up. It gets harder to do so if you wait. While this is not surprising, it is worth noting that just as you lay the foundation for dialogue and conversation offline with your children early, you have to lay that foundation early online. Even before they are on social media, talk to them about technology as a whole. It can help lay the groundwork for future conversations.

4) Seize key moments. There are many natural times to have these conversations: when they get their first mobile phone (it's a good time to establish ground rules), when your child turns 13 and is old enough to join Facebook, Instagram and other social media services, or when your child gets a driver's license (it's a good times to discuss the importance of not texting and driving).

5) Ask your children to teach you. Not on Instagram? Maybe you're interested in trying a streaming music service? If your children are already familiar with these services, they can be an excellent resource. The conversation can also serve as an opportunity to talk about issues of safety, privacy and security. For example, maybe you can ask them questions about privacy settings as you set up your own Facebook account. And, as most parents know all too well, your child will likely appreciate the opportunity to teach you.

This list is only a start and it may not fit the needs of your family exactly — the important thing is that you're having the conversation.

 

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