Pakistan's 'Killer Mountain': Never seen by anyone in winter

In this photograph taken on February 27, 2016 released by Marianna Zanatta Sports Marketing Management shows Italian climber Simone Moro (2R), Pakistani climber Ali Sadpara (R) and Spain climber Alex Txikon (L) posing for a photograph after scaling the peak of Nanga Parbat which is known as "Killer Mountain" and second highest peak after K2 along with an Italian climber Tamara Lunger (2L). AFP

Simone Moro stood atop Pakistan's "Killer Mountain" last week and observed the curve of the Earth -- a view which had never been seen by anyone in winter until the climber and his team conquered Nanga Parbat.

The expedition had taken three months and came more than six decades after the mountain was first summited, but 10 minutes was all Moro could allow himself to enjoy his achievement.

In this photograph taken on February 26, 2016 released by Marianna Zanatta Sports Marketing Management shows Italian climber Simone Moro (R) and Pakistani climber Ali Sadpara celebrate after scaling the peak of Nanga Parbat which is known as "Killer Mountain" and second highest peak after K2. AFP

"Now you have to come back... But you are so completely exhausted," the Italian mountaineer explained in an exclusive interview with AFP, saying he was afraid of losing concentration on the long, dangerous descent.

From the peak, 8,125 metres (26,660 feet) above sea level, the mountains of northern Pakistan and India stretched out before him -- including three more of the 14 eight-thousanders.