Fence aims to protect endangered wallabies

Only 150 of the endangered wallabies remain in the wild in South Australia because of predators such as foxes and cats and the effects of bushfires. (GETTY IMAGES)

An enclosure to keep out predators has been built in the remote APY Lands to help increase the population of black-footed rock wallabies.

It is estimated only 150 of the endangered wallabies remain in the wild in South Australia because of predators such as foxes and cats and the effects of bushfires.

Dr Matthew Ward from the Environment Department says it is hoped to breed the marsupials inside the enclosure and reintroduce them to other outback areas.

He says the program is being run by the warru recovery team.

"Management of the warru in the APY Lands can lead to broader landscape biodiversity benefits, but also a lot of employment and training of Aboriginal rangers in the APY Lands who get involved in the work," he said.

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