Catch the Transit of Venus... worldwide

Catch the Transit of Venus... worldwide

A jet plane crosses the sky as Venus moves past the sun are seen through a coelostat at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles. The planet Venus made a slow transit across the face of the sun on Tuesday, the last such passing that will be visible from Earth for 105 years. (GETTY/GALLO)

The planet Venus transits the Sun as seen from Beijing. One of the rarest astronomical events occurs on Tuesday and Wednesday when Venus passes directly between the sun and Earth, a transit that won't occur again until 2117. (REUTERS)

The planet Venus makes its transit across the Sun as seen from Kathmandu. The planet Venus made a slow transit across the face of the sun on Tuesday, the last such passing that will be visible from Earth for 105 years. (REUTERS)

Hong Kong stargazer use special filers on telescope to observe the transit of Venus  along the Victoria Habour in Hong Kong Wednesday, June 6, 2012. Stargazers around the world are setting up special telescopes and passing out cardboard eclipse glasses to view the once-in-a-lifetime celestial cameo of Venus passing in front of the sun. (AP)

 

People use special viewing glasses as they try to see the transit of Venus across the Sun as at the Universum Museum in the National University (UNAM)  in Mexico City, Mexico, Tuesday, June 5, 2012. Despite a very cloudy day, thousands of people gathered at the museum to get a glimpse of the event that will only be seen again in 2117. (AP)

 

Amanda Brown watches the transit of Venus at University of Alaska Anchorage in Anchorage, Alaska, on Tuesday, June 5, 2012. She placed crystals on her body, she said, to recharge them with good energy. Through protective glasses and telescopes, viewers could see the silhouette of Venus as it passed in front of the sun, an event that won't happen again for more than a century. (AP)

 

Elementary school students gather to watch the projection of Venus crossing the sun in Kobe, western Japan Wednesday, June 6, 2012. From the U.S. to South Korea, people around the world turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. The next one won't be for another 105 years. (AP)

 

A person uses a phone camera to photograph a projected image of the Sun and Venus during the transit at the Sydney Observatory in Sydney, Australia, Wednesday, June 6, 2012. From the U.S. to eastern Australia and eastern Asia, people turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. The next one won't be for another 105 years. (AP)

 

A bird sits atop one of the domes of the landmark Taj Mahal as Venus, top left, begins to pass in front of the sun, as visible from Agra, India, Wednesday, June 6, 2012. People around the world turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus.  (AP)

 

School children watch Venus cross the sun at the Sydney Observatory in Sydney, Australia,  Wednesday, June 6, 2012. People around the world turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. (AP)

 

A bird flies past as Venus crosses the sun over Raisina Hills in New Delhi, India Wednesday, June 6, 2012. People around the world turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. (AP)

 

Saudi men use a special telescope and  special protective viewing glasses to observe the transit of Venus at the capital Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Wednesday, June 6, 2012. People around the world turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus.  (AP)

 

Venus moves across the sun during the transit in Sydney, Australia, Wednesday, June 6, 2012. People around the world turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. (AP)

 

Planet Venus moves across the Sun during the transit in Kunming in southwest China's Yunnan province, Wednesday, June 6, 2012. People around the world turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the sight of the transit of Venus. (AP)

 

Indians watch Venus cross the sun, in New Delhi, India Wednesday, June 6, 2012. People around the world turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. (AP)

 

A Nepalese man is silhouetted as Venus, a black dot on top left of the Sun, is seen in Katmandu, Nepal, Wednesday, June 6, 2012. People around the world turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. (AP)

 

An Indian girl watches transit of Venus against the sun, in New Delhi, India , Wednesday, June 6, 2012.  People around the world turned their attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. (AP)